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  Official magazine of ACI
Monday, 09 July 2012 12:57

Rolls-Royce reveals world's only LEGO jet engine

Written by  Joe Bates
Visitors to the Farnborough International Airshow today saw something truly unique – the world's first and only Lego jet engine!

Visitors to the Farnborough International Airshow today saw something truly unique – the world's first and only Lego jet engine!

Built by Rolls-Royce and made entirely of Lego, the engine is a half size replica of the RR Trent 1000, which powers the B787 Dreamliner aircraft.

The one of a kind Lego structure shows the complex inner workings of a jet engine and took four people eight weeks to complete.

Including 152,455 Lego bricks, the engine weighs 307 kilos and is over two metre long and 1.5 metres wide.

Over 160 separate engine components were built and joined together in order to replicate a real jet engine.

Everything from the large fan blades which suck air into the engine down to the combustion chambers where fuel is burned, had to be analysed and replicated using the world famous building blocks.    

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The engine is part of a display in the Innovation Zone at Farnborough International Airshow, an area designed to engage young people in science, technology, engineering and maths.

Paul Stein, Rolls-Royce's chief scientific officer, says: “Engineers have critical roles to play in solving the challenges of tomorrow, not least designing aircraft engines that will power people to the furthest corners of the world more efficiently. 

"We are delighted to showcase this Lego engine, the first of its kind in the world, and we are very pleased some of our own graduates and apprentices have contributed to building it, ensuring it is as realistic as possible. 

"What we do is exciting and we hope that this representation of our technology will help to enthuse and inspire the potential scientists and engineers of the future about the career opportunities they could pursue.”

A team of graduates and apprentices from Rolls-Royce used their knowledge of the Trent 1000 engine to work with the company Bright Bricks, experts in Lego, to produce the most complex Lego structure ever built.

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Ben Russell, Rolls-Royce, higher technical apprentice says: “This is been such an exciting project to be a part of and something I never imagined I’d get to do. 

"Working as an apprentice in a high tech company like Rolls-Royce gives you the opportunity to learn about some of the most fascinating and advanced products in the world, and I hope our Lego engine will show others how exciting a career in engineering can be.”

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