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NEWS Last modified on October 31, 2011

Wellywood saga enters final stage

The ‘Wellywood or What?’ competition has been whittled down to the last five remaining potential signs that could replace the controversial Wellywood suggestion in the hills near Wellington International Airport.

The ‘Wellywood or What?’ competition has been whittled down to the last five remaining potential signs that could replace the controversial Wellywood suggestion in the hills near Wellington International Airport.

 

The public has seven days to choose their two favourite, which will then be put to a further vote against the Wellywood sign to determine what will be the permanent installation on the Miramar Peninsula near Wellington International Airport.
 

Voting is now open and will close at midnight on Sunday, November 6.
 

The competition came about after a public debate ensued around the Wellywood proposal and Wellington International Airport invited the public to come up with alternative ideas. 
 

“We were looking for ideas that were easily identifiable with Wellington and that would be a talking point for visitors. We believe that the five on the short list fulfill these criteria", Fran Wilde, chair of the panel that has facilitated the competition.
 

The top five ideas include:
 

Te Capital


 

Based on an idea submitted by Jan Gunn, it represents a positive link between culture and leadership – a fun take on the fact that Wellington is the proud capital of a country with two major cultures.  The sign would be painted at one end using a traditional weaving pattern and gradually change to modern, minimalist Wellington gold at the other.
 

Wellington - blown away


 

Over 35 people suggested using the word ‘Wellington’ in different formats. This particular idea, based on a design submitted by the team at Saatchi & Saatchi, and is a play on Wellington's windy reputation and also on the idea of being "blown away" by the Wellington region.
 

Taniwha


 

Eight people suggested using a sign to celebrate Ngake and Whataitai, the taniwha who lived in Wellington Harbour when it was enclosed by land, but who wanted to get out to the sea.
 

Eye of the Taniwha Whataitai


 

Based on an idea submitted by Stephen Maddock who suggested a representation of the eye of the taniwha Whataitai. The giant eyelid is partially closed and the eyeball will move with the wind, keeping a watch on the harbour.
 

Wellington's lost umbrellas


 

Images of lost or windblown umbrellas were suggested by five people, a positive and quirky affirmation of Wellington's wind, generated by its position on the edge of Cook Strait. This is an artist's impression of how a sign could be designed using an optical illusion to create a 3D look.
 

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